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There is just something about actually fixing and repairing something that would have otherwise been a throwaway I find to be extremely rewarding. Even moreso when its a repair a lot of people wouldn't attempt :)


A friend of mine on 3WW set me a PM a few weeks back saying he had an Odyssey pipe that was very rare he had, and it was really rusted out and basically falling apart. A previous owner had patched it with a piece of galvanized pipe, so it had already gotten some Appalachian engineering on it. Heres what Matt sent me to talk me into this project:

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So, the big thing I knew from looking at this thing was if I wanted to have a snowballs chance in hell of repairing it, it needed cleaned. So I asked Matt to take it by a radiator shop and have them put it in the hot dip tank to clean it up some before he sent it to me, as I didn't really want to burn half a day just cleaning it before work could even began. About a week later I got some good news and some bad news.

Good news was it did get cleaned. Bad news is the cancer and damage was a lot worse than we thought. 20160309_142453_zpsm4pcckbj.JPG 20160309_142458_zps6q8rgqxa.JPG Screenshot_1.jpg
 

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Discussion Starter #3 (Edited)
Should be interesting, right? :Clap:

I told him to go ahead and mail it to me and I'd see what I could do. Once it arrived I scoped out the pipe and decided I was going to basically cut that entire area out, and build a new sectional part for it. So once i decided exactly where that would fall at I took some basic measurements (length of area, diameter at one and, diameter at the other end, and approximate angles of the ends) and I plugged them into a program anyone that has ever built a pipe or considered building one has - Cone Layout. Cone Layout provides an interface to print off sheet metal templates you can then lay on metal and cut out, and put into a slip roll to get your cone shapes. Its like $40, and an amazing little piece of software worth 3x that amount (and more if you're actually doing this regularly)...

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So, here is my template after I printed it out on 2 sheets, taped it together to maintain its radi and shape. I also print on a thicker cardstock type material that makes templating and tracing off of a little bit easier than just regular paper. I've also got a pair of barber's scissors there to assist in the sheet metal cutting process.

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Then my next thing I had to figure out was, how exactly to maintain the positioning of the flange area and the rest of the pipe, after I cut it in half. I didn't have an Odyssey to mock it up against. But Matt had made some marks on it so I knew atleast where to align it up at (It was actually in 2 pieces already when it arrived, it just pulled in and out of that galvanized pipe easily). After thinking a bit, here is what I came up with.

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I welded a couple straps from the thicker part of the flange over across the center weld seam (where the material was thicker) and did that on the top and bottom. It wound up actually being a lot more rigid than I expected it to be. I also probably spent 20 minutes at the bench grinder on the wire wheel side before I even thought about trying to weld those on there. Even though it had been hot dipped, the pipe still had PLENTY of crud on it that needed removed before anything could be welded. I cleaned until it was shiny, as you can see in the pics.
 

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I ran into a little trouble with my bandsaw, I had to swap out the blade for a very fine toothed one suitable for this ~.035 thick material that wouldn't snag inbetween the teeth and snatch it. Very problematic and the easiest way to make a nice contoured sheet metal shape into a crumpled up mess in a hurry (ask me how I know). And then I broke the little blade and spent quite some time brazing it back together and grinding the excess off before I could finally actually get anything cut with it.

PRO TIP FROM EXPERIENCE!: When welding your own band saw blades, cut the ends at a 45degree angle or more, so you have more weld/braze/bonding surface rather than straight across at a 90 degree angle (ask me how I know).

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Looked pretty good and clean once it was cut and the old piece removed. The straps I welded on kept everything surprisingly solid, it had basically zero movement in it.
 

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Didn't do much more pictures of the individual sectioning and frustrations of making everything semi line up and fit (it was a bit more difficult to make it fit exactly between those 2 areas than I had expected). I also had a lot of trouble welding even the new fresh material - my assumption is once the material and surrounding areas got warm they started releasing carbon fumes and god only knows what else from the inside which was contaminating the back of my weld areas. Regardless, I got it put back together and its 100% better than it was before. With my band saw issues this wound up being about a 7 hour or so job. Could have been less.




Don't ever throw anything away! :NodYes:

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Hell yea. Its fun keeping stuff like that alive.
 

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nice work….
 

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Very nice. These are the talents I'm afraid we will lose, with the next generation of kids. Get off your asses and in to the shop. Again, nice save. :Clap:
 
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