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Friends / Members; E2S is in need of more technical columns. Porting, head machining, WELDING, general mechanics, on & on. I’ve communicated with some of you who are engineers, many of you have technical skills which we all can learn from, come on folks, step up & be a teacher in your own skills. Most of this knowledge which we posses isn’t a trade secret, merely we know it or we don’t know it. Education is the key to advancement, wherever it may take us.


There are a lot of you people who seem to think that hiding your skills is your Trade Secret. This kind of thinking is a bunch of BS & rather self centered. Many of you have the idea that educating a customer will cause you to loose business, NOT SO. Teaching the trade about skills will enhance your business as well as educating others about how things work & are put together.


Most of us read E2S to learn & exchange information; I’m not the only one who knows something about our interests. Some may think that starting a technical thread is too time consuming, not so. I find that writing a biweekly addition to “How it’s Done” makes me think about my job. It seems to me that the older we get the more we feel about the importance of teaching younger people. I’ll be 66 in September & don’t wish to take my skills with me when I’m gone; how about some of the rest of you, blink your eyes & the next 20 years will be gone.


I love to get my hands dirty & work with 2-stroke engines, 2 more Kwik Way boring bars will arrive this week. Fundamentals of 2-strokes haven’t changed much from the beginning of this wonderful simple source of power. It’s exciting to think about what kind of project will come in next. About the most notable thing that I’ve seen in my time is water cooling & power valves, what else have you all seen? We need more of you to be a skill teacher, my coffee cup is empty. Think about it, most of you have something worth sharing with the rest of us.

E2S: The place to go when you need to know

:Cheers:
 

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Knowledge is useless unless passed along.

Biggest "advancement" is CDI. These young guys don't know the joy of having a 2s kick back while trying to start it.
 

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John, I have to give you a lot of respect and credit for sharing your wealth of knowledge in the field of sleeving and repairing engine cylinders as where some people would think that the one that they own is beyond repair and spend senseless money on a new or used one that when they get it, they are in the same boat as to when they first started.

I honestly, I enjoy reading your detailed documentation of your various projects that come into you shop.

I myself, have been in the automotive repair business for better than 25 years. Unfortunately, that has no benefit to the education of the 2 stroke atv or motorcycle.

I have a wealth of knowledge in this field however, this doesn't help the "stranded" 2 stroker looking for answers.

I own 2 Suzuki Quadracer 250's and it made me mad one day that someone told me that I own "The slowest production quad ever made". That put me on a mission to prove them wrong!
I bought the Blair and Bell books, read them.. [well the Blair book ] was a bit more difficult, being that I am not an advanced mathematician. Anyhow, I spent countless hours reading the theory and self learning the art of trying to make "the slowest quad in the world" perform to prove them wrong. After years of research and trial and error, The person that told me that day and, I won't forget it...He didn't have a word to say to me but... Wow!

Occasionally, when I see a post about making a Quadracer 250 faster, I do chime in for people that want info. I want to see more of these Zuki's still live, breathe, and last of all Kick some butt!

Unfortunately, Unlike the Honda's and Banshees' they do not offer an "up to today's technology" aftermarket cylinder.
Think about it... How many Suzuki Quadracer's are still in circulation? A lot more than many think!

I am not a Machinist, but I am an auto technician with a passion and knowledge of at least the Suzuki Quadracer 250.

Sorry for the long, drawn out response but, Time is kind of an issue being that I have a 7 yr. old daughter which takes up time.

I was actually thinking of doing an article on an "Override Transmission" and how to copy one from one that has been done.


John you are doing an Incredible job documenting your projects! Keep up the good work !

Joe
 

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Thank you Joe; You are a gentlemen. Maybe your daughter will be interested in riding a quad some day.
:NodYes:
 

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How about starting a new thread for basic mechanics’? This may seem a little petty to most of you. I’ll bet there are many newbie’s who come to E2S who don’t know how to do many things. It’s easy to get the hang of it, just start taking pictures of whatever project you’re working on. When the job is finished it’s pretty easy to sort things out & write about it. Not much creativity is needed to take on this minor responsibility.

For those who are thinking about starting a new business, this is a good way to spread the word about your abilities. Out of our 25K or so members somebody out there can do this. Your home country doesn’t matter with the Google language translator. Who’s it going to be?
:Thumbsup2:
 

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I own 2 Suzuki Quadracer 250's and it made me mad one day that someone told me that I own "The slowest production quad ever made". That put me on a mission to prove them wrong!

Joe
Must have been one ignorant S.O.B!

Anyway I too enjoyed Mr. Tice's threads.
 

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John's got the right idea, Joe. You have plenty of tech knowledge applicable to 2-strokes. For instance, there are a lot of guys who don't have a very good grasp of ignition timing and what factors affect the timing n engine needs under varied conditions. I wrote a long explanation on an automotive site, www.coltvista.com, that explained how the vacuum and centrifugal timing systems in an automotive distributor work, how the two systems are sometimes working in opposite directions, why the engine can need more or less time to get the fire lit and the intake charge burning, and tied it all together with a description of a car idling at a stoplight, then accelerating under WOT on to a freeway, then easing back to freeway cruise speed, and describing what was happening inside the distributor and in the combustion chambers at each stage. Unfortunately, the host of that site has let it get disconnected or I would paste that article here. No, our old ring dings have neither vacuum nor centrifugal advance systems, but if a guy can understand how and WHY they work as they do (or did, pre-computer), he will have a good grasp of the reasons for wanting more or less spark advance. Joe, you know plenty of other things useful here.

OTOH, one wonders, with the wealth of information all over the internet, why some of the askers can't do some searching. I suppose that sometimes they don't know that the question are basic, with good explanations widely available. As Donald Rumsfeld famously said (and I actually thought it was pretty good, as he explained it), "We have known knowns, known unknowns, and unknown unknowns." But I do think too many guys want their hands held, want information with no effort on their part while men who have troubled themselves to study and learn are expected to take their time to write out answers for the lazy.

Also, John generously offers up a different variety of information, something that is not readily available at all.
 

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Speaking of searching I always start by using the search box on forums (I can't stand looking through garbage that search engines find like google) unless I find f.a.qs first but something that bugs me is that 3 letter words are cut out when searching for info. This becomes a problem as a lot of people use abbreviations like WOT or common words like gap.
 

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It seems especially true with younger people, wanting spoon fed answers. But also, some don't know what terms to use to search (as I sometimes don't)

Maybe a DIY thread on some of the simplist things that we just do without thinking about. Such as removing stripped phillips head screws on cases. Properly gapping rings.

Alternative repairs, make it work.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
How about using an impact wrench on Phillips case screws. You all have good ideas, how about being a teacher for the rest????????????????
 

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I have no great skill at it either, but just now using the search engine for this site, I found several threads on removing stripped fasteners. There are articles and threads on end-gap on numerous motorsports sites, piston and ring manufacturers sites, etc..

Re. stripped head on Phillips screws (and be aware that Reed and Prince heads are very common, and look similar to but are not the same as Phillips heads, and each type properly should have a Phillips or R&P screwdriver. Or maybe you should immediately replace them all with Allen heads . . . ):


EXTRACTING BROKEN FASTENERS ---

First principle - Heat is your friend, if you can apply it (maybe not if the engine still is in the bike with a carb on it, obviously). When I worked in a salt water marina in the early '60s, we referred to the cart with the oxy-acetylene torch as "Mercury Special Tool #1"

1) WD-40. And get a flat-end punch and hammer, and smack the top of the fastener a couple of times hoping to jog it loose from the corrosion. Doesn't work very often, but isn't a bad idea for a start.
2) Try to back it out with a sharp cold chisel, if you can get at it.
Alternatively, if you have an impact driver of any kind, use a new, sharp-edged bit of the correct size. With Phillips drivers, I sometimes take a Dremel and grind a slight angle into the flutes so that they tend to dig in better when going in the REMOVE direction (this makes the bit unusable for going the other way).
3) Left-hand drillbit in a reversible drill motor. You are drilling a hole for an EZ-Out, but quite often the drillbit will at some point grab the srcrew and back it right out of its hole, which is why you use them for this step in preference to ordinary RH bits. A set of several sizes of LH drillbits is a pretty good thing to have, and amaze others who aren't clued in yet.
4} If the drillbit hasn't done the job already, go ahead with the EZ-Out.

5) The first choice in an automotive machine shop would be to immediately go with the MIG-welder (hard-wire). Other kinds of welders and heating options have been used for a century, but a MIG welder is particularly well-suited to this unglamorous chore.
The goal is to deposit a big enough glob of steel on top of what's left of your fastener that you can grab it with a Vise-Grip and work it back and forth in slowly increasing amounts until it loosens up and you can turn it out. The concentrated heat that is input by this operation helps enormously. If the welded glob breaks off from the fastener, try again.

6) If all else fails, maybe take the part to a machine shop with an EDM machine that will burn out the fastener.

At this point, if the threads were destroyed, search this site for the discussion of Heli-Coils.


Note that Phiilips heads were invented specifically for a property that unintentionally makes them hard to remove later. Factories wanted a fastener head that, unlike ordinary slotted heads, kept the driving bit on-center. The special feature of the Phillips head was "cam-out;" the installing driver woud have a calibrated spring behind the bit so that once the fastener was driven tight to the desired torque, the bit would be "cammed-out" of the head, against the tension of the spring. Great for installing a million screws, not so great for us, because our screwdrivers also try to cam-out, buggering the head.

WOT is hot rodder talk for wide-open throttle. An impolite variant is WFO.
 

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I run into the phillip screw issue all the time in the automotive field almost every day.

Most foreign cars use them to hold the brake rotors to the hub. I use a flat chisel in an air hammer to just do a quick "burb" on the end if the phillip screw and the just simply hand turn the screw out.

Another "trick" is when taking the harmonic balancer "crank shaft" bolt off, Sometimes...especially Honda, A typical air impact gun won't break the bolt loose. I will use a socket and breaker bar and put it on the bolt and securely wedge the handle somewhere in the subframe. While holding it against the frame, have a friend tap the key a couple of times and Wolah! loose bolt!

Just some of the neat tricks to make life a little bit easier!

Joe
 

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Tip:If you want magnetic screwdrivers but don't want to spend money on them cause you already have a nice set then simple rub the ends on a powerful magnet like a speaker.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
I’ve got an idea: It seems as though there may not be much interest in starting up a new How To thread. How about using “Are you a Teacher” for smaller ideas & such. This may be just the thing for your Ideas & ways to do things. We already have suggestions for removing stuck Phillips head screws. Think about ways to solve problems & put them here. We can see how things start to build.
JT
 

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Or maybe we could start the articles here, and after we get feedback then come back and edit what we did to get a pretty good free-standing article that the site host could then copy and paste into a "How-to" sticky thread.

For my part, I prefer to get plenty of feedback when I go out on a limb by writing as if I know what I'm talking about. In the first place, I don't know what the background knowledge level is for others; I don't want to talk down to anybody, but I don't want to make the new guy guess too much. And maybe others won't get what I'm trying to say in my sometimes clunky fashion. I don't know if I'm telling others what THEY want to know. So if I can get feedback on one of these little essays for a few months, I could go back and edit it, and then PM you or the site host or somebody and say, "Check this article, it's about as good as I can get it, see if you think it ought to be in the permanent "How-to" section."
 

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Man I'm glad I remembered this thread. I was in the garage the other day working on replacing my quadracer's stator. I had gotten the flywheel off (it was stuck bad) and then moved onto the stator its self witch has 3 Phillips screws. I got the best fitting screw driver I could find and gave it a tap with my handy mallet. With a lot of pressure I tried loosening it but the screw just started smearing. I'm thinking $HIT this is going to be fun!:angry2::violent5: I decided to come in and cool off (and check my favorite forum E2S). I thought of this thread and thanks to seattle smitty's post I went back out and tried the punch and hammer (I used my mallet) and with a few wacks, I saw it spin ever so slightly. Then presto all three screws were out!:blob1::NodYes: This site truly is awesome as I completely forgot about that technique (I was pissed).
 

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